Difference between revisions of "Sternoclavicular Joint"

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There are several vital structures directly posterior to the SCJ. This includes the subclavian vessels, trachea, and oesophagus.
 
There are several vital structures directly posterior to the SCJ. This includes the subclavian vessels, trachea, and oesophagus.
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In a small portion of cases there is a facet that articulates with the first rib.
  
 
==See Also==
 
==See Also==

Revision as of 18:50, 12 April 2021

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SCJ anterior view, with ligaments

The sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) is diarthrodial, and consists of the articulation between the manubrium sterni, the proximal clavicle, and the cartilage of the first rib.

The joint is stabilised by three major ligaments:

  • Sternoclavicular ligament. This consists of the anterior, posterior, superior, and inferior sternoclavicular ligaments. It attaches the manubrium sterni to the clavicle
  • Costoclavicular ligament. This attaches the cartilage of the first rib to the clavicle
  • Interclavicular ligament. This attaches the proximal end of one clavicle to the other. It also attaches to the superior manubrium sterni.

The joint has an intraarticular disc or meniscus.

There are several vital structures directly posterior to the SCJ. This includes the subclavian vessels, trachea, and oesophagus.

In a small portion of cases there is a facet that articulates with the first rib.

See Also